Employment Matters - July 2019

Employment Matters - July 2019's Tags

Tags related to this article

Employment Matters - July 2019

Published 3 julio 2019

DAC Beachcroft's Employment Matters focuses on some of the most interesting cases and events occurring within the Employment Law sector.

DSAR responses: High Court decides paper files need to be considered, and gives guidance on reasonable and proportionate searches (as well as legal professional privilege)

In this case the High Court (in a remitted hearing from the Court of Appeal) looked at whether a law firm had complied with data subject access requests from a beneficiary of a Bahamian law discretionary trust. The case has significant implications for employer responding to employee DSARs.

Read more

Collective Bargaining: Unlawful inducement

A one-off direct offer to employees bypassing collective bargaining was not an unlawful inducement.

Read more

Right to Privacy: Employer's reliance in dismissal procedure on material found by police on an employee's phone was not a breach of the employee's right to privacy

An employer who, when deciding to dismiss an employee, relied on material found on an employee’s phone during a police investigation into allegations of harassment, had not breached his right to privacy.

Read more

Disability Discrimination: Perceived disability

An employer’s refusal to accept a request from a serving police offer to transfer because it thought she would end up on restricted duties because her hearing was below the police’s recruitment standard was discrimination because of a perceived disability.

Read more

Court of Appeal confirms regular voluntary overtime should be included in holiday pay

The Court of Appeal has upheld the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) decision in Flowers v East of England Ambulance Trust. It has confirmed that voluntary overtime should be included in the first four weeks holiday pay so long as such payments are sufficiently regular and settled enough to amount to "normal" pay.

Read more

Discrimination? No discrimination where shared parental leave pay and enhanced maternity pay are not paid at the same level

If you offer enhanced maternity pay do you also have to enhance shared parental leave pay? On 11 April the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) clarified that employers which enhance maternity pay for the first 14 weeks but not shared parental pay do not directly discriminate against men.

Read more

 

 

Authors

Ceri Fuller

Ceri Fuller

London - Walbrook

+44 (0)20 7894 6583

< Back to articles