ThreatInformer - December 2017

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ThreatInformer - December 2017

Published 22 December 2017

Importance of Breach Disclosure

According to Bloomberg, Uber suffered a major data breach in October 2016 when hackers discovered developers had published usernames and passwords into a publically available computer code repository - Github. The credentials gave the attackers instant access to Uber data stores containing troves of sensitive customer and driver information

While Uber’s developers aren’t the first to make this mistake, what really stand out is how it was managed. Neither regulators, nor data subjects were notified and the decision to keep them in the dark was made at the most senior levels of the organisation.

By failing to publicly disclose the breach for over a year, Uber is likely to have broken multiple breach disclosure laws and could face heavy fines in multiple states and countries. In the UK, where an estimated 2.7m customers have had data stolen, the ICO has reported it’s “still waiting for technical reports which should give full confirmation of the figures and the type of personal data that has been compromised”. 

In the US Uber is already facing state-backed lawsuits, from Illinois and Washington.

Cyber breaches are becoming a common part of life for companies, but it’s how a firm responds to events that can really land it in hot water.

Insurers may want to consider their policy wording in light of this incident to ensure they are happy with the requirements on insureds to notify them of incidents. Claims-made policies could be especially vulnerable to these issues, as legal action is occurring over a year since the compromise event.

In related news Github has also recently published tools to help firms be more secure, read more.  

Patch now! Apple fixes major hole in MacOS High Sierra

An incredibly easy-to-exploit bug was recently found in MacOS High Sierra (10.13) which enables a user to bypass system security and gain admin rights without a password. The widely publicised flaw was patched on November 29 and businesses should ensure that all Macs are up to date.

If left unpatched, the bug would allow anyone sitting at a corporate Mac to gain local admin access by entering "root" as the username and leaving the password field empty. While this can be abused by human users, it could also be used by malware to gain super-user privileges, read more. 

Authors

Hans Allnutt

Hans Allnutt

London - Walbrook

+44 (0) 20 7894 6925

Rhiannon Webster

Rhiannon Webster

London - Walbrook

+44 (0)20 7894 6577

Patrick Hill

Patrick Hill

London - Walbrook

+44 (0)20 7894 6930

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